Wednesday, July 8, 2015

PA Water-Venture Kayaking Event - Mangrove Discovery Series | 28Jun2015


Introduced in 2013, People’s Association Water Venture Discovery Series aims to let Singaporeans appreciate the wildlife and vegetation along the country's waterways.


Here I am at the Water-Venture Sembawang
Located at 60 Jalan Mempurong Singapore 759058.


For the Mangrove Discovery Series!


Mangrove Discovery Series is the latest addition to the Discovery Series programmes. Singapore’s land space used to be made up of over 10% in mangroves but this number has dwindled to under a percent in recent decades due to rapid development and reclamation. 
 
Launched this July, the programme will bring participants through mangrove habitats around Singapore - Sungei Simpang, Sungei Api Api and Khatib Bongsu.
 
Other than learning about the history and importance of mangroves for biodiversity to the urban population, participants will get to enjoy the challenge of navigating along Singapore’s coast line, weaving through twisting routes, experience the wide variety of flora and fauna in the mangrove habitat and have lots of fun bonding with fellow participants.
 
When I arrived.. there were many people there already.
They were all with me for the Mangrove Discovery Series that afternoon! :)
 
What were they so drawn to..?
 
.. the instructors who would taught us basic technics of kayaking
and also things to take note about kayaking, how to hold and carry the kayak etc.
 
Its has really been quite some time since I last kayak.. hence it was a good experience to hone my skills again! haha.. :P
 
They gave good and clear instructions..
 
And from this event.. I learnt that better kayak.. something like this is made of Fibre Glass..
 
But after all, most importantly is our safety..
we were briefed carefully what to take note on and not to commit.
E.g. Not holding on to the strings surrounding the kayak.. we may jus cut or burned ourselves.
 

With me here are HP and Samuel..
Really nice to see them there.. so I'm not alone! :P

Oh.. we were caught taking Wefie! Nice one though~! ;)

Getting our Gears ready!

And now we are ALL READY!





Hong Peng and Samuel..



 Guess we spotted a Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea)
This is a common resident bird that is commonly seen around water bodies, such as in mangrove forests and marshlands, or near rivers and ponds. This tall bird can reach heights of about 1m, and has a light grey plumage. The adult has black stripes on its long neck. The long legs enable it to wade in shallow water or among tall grasses to hunt small animals, such as fishes, amphibians, reptiles, insects, crustaceans and even small mammals and birds.
 
 
a better and nicer picture would be this! :)
 




Another Grey Heron.



Looks like everyone is having a fun time! :)

Not forgetting Hong Peng & Samuel..
Aiseh.. HP using GoPro leh! ;P



a ShOt of ALL of US forming a Kayak RAFT!

Wow.. this is a Stunt!


Sailing our way back...

Samuel lookin' cool with shades.. but seems abit tired!
Must be HP didn't row~! He keep taking photos! haha.. jus joking!


Finally we are back to the shores...



Wow Samuel Muscular! Eh.. HP and Sam's phone got drenched. Water went in to the zip locked bag. :(
On the optimistic side.. they got a new phone now! :)

Post-event briefing!

We were sort of the 1st batch to try on this Mangrove Discovery Series, hence they would like to hear a lot from us as to what they can improve to enhance the overall experience of the event next time. :)

 
Well.. the overall experience was good!
I had a good tan and workout out in the sea..
Experiencing the good moments of kayaking through the mangrove precinct and having myself getting closer to the nature.
 
- - -
 
The term 'mangrove' can refer to the highly adapted coastal plants that are partially submerged in sea water during high tide or the ecosystem itself. The plants will need to adapt to the salt water, the unstable ground, and the lack of oxygen in the soil. Mangroves are important as many of our food and materials come from mangroves.
 
Here are some of the plants and living things that you will probably be able to observe during the
Mangrove Discovery Series!
 

Sea Hibiscus (Talipariti tiliaceum)
The Sea Hibiscus has heart-shaped leaves and is very commonly seen in Singapore’s coastal areas. Interestingly, the flowers are yellow in the morning, but turn orange or red towards the end of the day, and will be shed usually by the next day. The fibre from the bark is used to make ropes and caulk boats.
 
Mangrove Apple (Sonneratia alba)
Like other Sonneratia species, it has conical roots protruding from the ground. The fruits and leaves are edible, while the wood is used for various construction purposes, such as the construction of buildings, bridges, boats, wooden tools and furniture.
 
Collared Kingfisher (Todiramphus chloris)
This is one of the commonest kingfishers in Singapore. Most of the time, they could be well-hidden among the foliage, but you could often still hear the distinctive cackling call. They do not just feed on fish though, but insects as well.
 
Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea)
This is a common resident bird that is commonly seen around water bodies, such as in mangrove forests and marshlands, or near rivers and ponds. This tall bird can reach heights of about 1m, and has a light grey plumage. The adult has black stripes on its long neck. The long legs enable it to wade in shallow water or among tall grasses to hunt small animals, such as fishes, amphibians, reptiles, insects, crustaceans and even small mammals and birds.
 
Giant Mudskipper (Periophthalmodon schlosseri)
This is the largest mudskipper species in Singapore. It is able to survive out of water by holding water in its mouth and gill chambers. It can breathe through its skin when it is wet too. Being a rather aggressive fish, it feeds on other small animals, such as crabs or worms.
 
Halfbeak (Zenarchopterus buffonis)
They are called halfbeaks as their lower jaws are usually much longer than their upper jaws. Most species of halfbeaks are omnivorous, feeding on both plant matter floating near the water surface and small animals. Many species are popular food fishes in the region.
 
Tree-climbing Crab (Episesarma sp.)
During high tide, you may encounter many of these crabs climbing up to trees to avoid the predatory fishes in the water. Tree-climbing crabs are primarily leaf-eaters. They are also called vinegar crabs, because the Teochews are known to pickle this crab in black sauce with vinegar.
 
Malayan Water Monitor (Varanus salvator)
This is one of the largest lizards in the world, being able to grow to about 3m long, though most are below 2m. It has thick and leathery skin with non-overlapping scales. It can swim and climb very well, and feeds on carrion or hunt for fishes and other small animals. They are often trapped by locals for their meat, which is consumed, and their hides, which can be made into leather products.
 
 
- - -
 
 
Here are the stuffs I got from the event. :)
 
 If ya wanna try on this Mangrove Discovery Series at the Water-Venture Sembawang..
Click Here!
 
Here's the PA Water-Venture Facebook Page:

Do Check 'em Out!
 

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