Friday, March 27, 2015

10 quotes from Mr Lee Kuan Yew's 1977 'awesome' speech in Parliament!

Parliament holds a special sitting on Thursday to honour the late Mr Lee Kuan Yew, Singapore's founding Prime Minister, who had made countless speeches in Parliament during his decades in politics.

One of his speeches was described as "awesome" by Emeritus Senior Minister Goh Chok Tong on Facebook on Wednesday.



It was a three-and-a-half hour address in February 1977 to a House that welcomed 11 new Members of Parliament, including Mr Goh, then 36, and it made a deep impression on the young Marine Parade MP who was to succeed Mr Lee as Prime Minister later in 1990.

Here are some extracts of that speech:

1. On succession
Perhaps I ought to begin by saying that they (new MPs) ought to take themselves seriously because we, on this side as Members of the Government, take them seriously. Upon us is the burden of finding a successor Government worthy of its responsibilities. It is not an easy job.

2. On population policy
We have got seven Catholics, and they are all good Catholics. I know the Papal bull - when I say "the Papal bull", I am not saying that in jest. I think that is the technical term, is it not? Whatever it is, the Pope issues his interpretation, and the interpretation is that you can only do it by the rhythm method. Well, I wish all Catholics have a good sense of rhythm.

3. An educated man
My definition of an educated man is a man who never stops learning and wants to learn. I am not interested in whether a man has a Ph.D or not, or an M.A. for that matter, or a diploma. Mao never had one, neither had Khrushchev, nor Stalin.

4. Why bilingualism is important
Way back in 1965 we found ourselves suddenly independent. If you lose that Chinese education and you go completely English-educated, you will lose that drive, that self-confidence. That is what is wrong. The danger is, if you are Chinese-educated and only Chinese-educated, you are monolingual, then your source of literature will be communist. That is big trouble. But if you are bilingual, you have binocular vision, then you see the world in 3-D.

5. A lecture on psephology
Because for a few years we were in Malaysia, for two years, when we did our psephological analysis. In case the press gets me wrong, it is psephology and not psychology. I have a dictionary here. It is the science of how people vote. Just in case they dispute my definition, I have brought the Shorter Oxford Dictionary and it is in the addenda. It is not in the body of the dictionary itself. It is a new science. Psephology - the study of trends in voting or elections. From Greek psephos (pebble) because when the Greek voted he threw a pebble.

6. Independence
Let me assure all honourable members that each time I swear the oath of allegiance to the Republic of Singapore, my mind goes back to the 9th of August, 1965. I did not want it. We had independence thrust upon us. And the expectation was that in two to three years we would be so down on our knees and crawling that we would have to go back on any terms. No autonomy in Education, Labour, and all the other subjects. Different terms. Maybe if they were kind, like Penang and Malacca. But we resolved to make this work. Never forget that it was the will, not just of a few men. That was necessary. But the will was in the people. Otherwise it would not have worked.

7. On clean government
We did not fight the elections in December 23. We fought it as from September 1972. We made sure that no MP, no Parliamentary Secretary, no Minister misbehaved or abused his power. Because if you do, it is a very tight and swift compact society, it spreads like wild fire.
I am not saying, "No, let us be celibate." I am not even asking let us all be faithful to our wives, let us have no divorces. I do not ask that. All I ask is, please do not misbehave yourself. Anybody who has a paternity suit against him is out and there will be a by-election. That is all I say. Let us have none of this.

8. Being Chinese vs being Singaporean
When I went to China, I discovered that I was not a Chinaman. Yes, Mr Lee Khoon Choy will be my witness. I brought my young daughter with me for political reasons... It was for definite specific political reasons, one of them being to test how a Chinese-educated girl, but bilingual, would react to this situation. I am glad to say that we will relax our regulations about young people visiting China... in small groups, there is no better education for a proper appreciation of Singapore. You come back and kiss the soil.

9. On Singaporeans
You know the Singaporean. He is a hard-working, industrious, rugged individual. Or we would not have made the grade. But let us also recognise that he is a champion grumbler.

10. Popular vs populist
If you want to be popular, do not try to be popular all the time. Popular government does not mean that you do popular things all the time. We do not want to be unpopular or to do unpopular things. But when they are necessary, they will be done. Popular representative government means that within each five-year period, your policies have demonstrably worked and won popular support. That is what it means. And if we flinch from the unpopular, we are in deep trouble.

DISNEY’S BEAUTY AND THE BEAST INTERNATIONAL TOUR


Beauty and the Beast has been running for a staggering 21 years. It opened on Broadway in 1994, when it was nominated for 9 Tony Awards and ran for 13 years! It is also the seventh longest-running musical in Broadway history. 

Now the original musical spetacular, Disney’s Beauty and the Beast had made their way to Singapore's Marina Bay Sands’ Mastercard Theatres and tickets are currently on sale. The original 1991 Academy-Award winning animated feature film now come alive in musical. 

Audiences in Singapore will be able to see the same kind of stage as the original Broadway production, which includes Tony Award-winning costumes from Ann Hould-Ward and music by Alan Menken, whose work on Beauty and the Beastbagged him two Academy Awards. 


What make this musical interesting? Beauty and the beauty is a fairytale story many people read when they are young.  which I enjoyed reading as a child. It's now transcends all ages. The musical is funny and touching. This musical is definitely suitable for kids, couples and families.
___________________________________________________________________________

 
Beauty and Beast Musical Synopsis:



From the producers of The Lion King, the award-winning production of Disney's BEAUTY AND THE BEAST comes to Singapore in March 2015. This new touring production has been put together by the original creators of the Broadway production, including the Tony Award® winning costumes from Ann Hould-Ward.

Disney's BEAUTY AND THE BEAST features the animated film's Academy Award®-winning score with music by Alan Menken and lyrics by the late Howard Ashman, with additional songs with music by Alan Menken and lyrics by Tim Rice.


Disney's Beauty and the Beast is the classic story of Belle, a young woman in a provincial town, and the Beast, who is really a young prince trapped in a spell placed by an enchantress. If the Beast can learn to love and be loved, the curse will end and he will be transformed to his former self. But time is running out. If the Beast does not learn his lesson soon, he and his household will be doomed for all eternity.


Disney's Beauty and the Beast has become an international sensation that has played to over 35 million people worldwide in 13 countries.




Details:
Season: From 21st March to 19th April 2015
Tuesdays to Fridays at 8:00pm;
Saturdays at 2:00pm and 8:00pm;
Sundays at 1:00pm and 5.00pm.
Venue: MasterCard Theatres, Marina Bay Sands
Ticket Price: From $65, excluding the booking fee of S$3 per ticket

Bookings can be made online at either one of these three sites:
or by phone at +65 6688 8826

or in person at Marina Bay Sands Box Offices (Museum, Theatres, SkyPark, Retail Mall and Hotel Tower 1 Lobby).


Thursday, March 26, 2015

This video of Mr. Lee Kuan Yew really made me laughed! :)



This was really good!

Pinoy asked Lee Kuan Yew a Stupid & Irrelevant Question!



Filipino student shut down and dismissed by Lee Kuan Yew for asking irrelevant question

In this profoundly cringe-inducing video, Filipino student Harvey Campos suffers an epic smacking down by Singapore Elder Statesman and former Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew. During the question-and-answer segment of some sort of convention, Campos had attempted to inquire into how Lee's work was influenced by his late wife (jumping of the "old adage" that behind every successful man is a woman).

Lee responded by saying that he was there to discuss public matters and not family matters.
(From my point of view.. Lee Kuan Yew is still more vigilant, alert and wiser than the guy who is asking him that question)

Campos was clearly out of his depth in the presence of the Elder Statesman. He...
(1) Spent an unnecessary amount of time introducing himself and his personal circumstances, within which time he;

(2) Weaved a lame attempt at flattery into his protracted lead up to the point he was going to make which, as it turns out;

(3) Was completely irrelevant to the objectives of the forum.
 
Suffice to say, Campos grossly misread the situation and, most appallingly Lee himself.
This episode is reminiscent of the Filipino celebrity journalist Ricky Lo's gaffe while interviewing Les Misrables star Anne Hathaway last year.

Like Lo, Campos fell into the trap of regarding Lee through the lens of a typical way Filipinos communicate with celebrities or people of stature. Rather than step up to speak at their level, it seems a common approach Filipinos take is to try to bring the level of the dialogue down to a more comfortable but substandard level of discourse.

I would give a clap to Mr. Lee Kuan Yew for putting the pinoy down with just two words, "Full stop!"

Monday, March 23, 2015

Mr. Lee Kuan Yew whom We Respect!

 




As long as I'm in charged.. Nobody is going to knock it down!
 


Thank you Mr. Lee Kuan Yew for your contribution to the success of Singapore!
 

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Singapore Premiere of SARA《雏妓》

 
First of all.. this is a R21 movie.

If you do not know wad is R21.. it means u must be at least of age 21 years old to watch this movie.
I would explain this because someone really did ask me wad is R21. :P

I guess last time we called it RA..

Well watched the trailer here below!
 

 
SYPNOSIS
 
Journalist Sara has just spent four months completing an in-depth investigation piece. Her editor-in-chief, afraid of offending powerful politicians and business moguls, refuses to run it. Sara’s boyfriend, who works for the same magazine, chooses not to warn her and even sides with the editor-in-chief. In just one moment, Sara is turned off by her work, her love relationship and even about life.
 
At this low point in her life, Sara exiles herself to Chiang Mai, Thailand. One evening, while at a bar, Sara meets child prostitute Dok-my. During her time getting to know Dok-my and through the process of rescuing her, Sara becomes haunted by the memories of her own past.
 






 
 
 
 

ABOUT THE CASTS

Charlene Choi – Charlene Choi bursts onto the Hong Kong pop music scene in 2001 and has been featured in almost 50 films. Charlene made her film debut in Heroes in Love  (2001). Since then, she has proved to be a prolific, versatile and promising actress. Whether in The Twins Effect (2003) , A Chinese Tall Story (2005) or The Midas Touch (2013), Charlene has never failed to surprise and to impress. She won Best Actress in the 11th Puchon International Fantastic Film Festival for her performance in Diary (2007), followed by Best Actress in Golden Bauhinia Award in 2007 for Simply Actors (2007).

Simon Yam – Veteran actor Simon Yam started his acting career at television station making more than 190 drama series before striking out into films. Since then, he has become a mainstay in Johnnie To’s crime thrillers, such as PTU (2004) and Election (2006), for which he was named Best Actor at the Hong Kong Golden Bauhinia Awards. He scored a hat-trick at the Hong Kong Film Awards with Mabel Cheung’s nostalgic Echoes of the Rainbow in 2010. Yam also co-starred opposite Angelina Jolie in Tomb Raider II and took part in 2 Korean Films: co-starred in the top-grossing The Thieves (2012) and cameo in Cold Eyes (2013).


MY REVIEW

I personally find that the movie was quite good actually. It does show occurrence of a young prostitute in Thailand and how it relates it to Charlene Choi's life in the movie. Its a daring role for Charlene. Thumbs up! But I think the movie would be good for a M18.. becos there isn't any or aren't many real exposures of private parts of any of the female actresses in the movie. It would be abit low rated for an R21.
Overall.. I would say the movie... CAN WATCH! :)


Movie Rating: 7/10


CATCH THE SHOW IN CINEMAS ON 26 MARCH!!


 


Tuesday, March 17, 2015

10 Facts about MILO!


Popular energy drink Milo - sold under the Nestle company - has been put under the spotlight after authorities in Malaysia seized RM250,000 (S$94,058) worth of imitation Milo products in Negeri Sembilan on March 13.

Milo in refill packs were found to have been counterfeit products.

Such refill packs that can be bought in Singapore are not affected as they are made in Singapore, Nestle Singapore told The Straits Times on Monday (March 16).

The incident prompted Nestle Malaysia to embark on a campaign to educate its customers on how to spot the fakes.
 




It posted a photo on Facebook showing consumers how to distinguish fake Milo packaging by looking at the perforation on every pack. Here are 10 facts you may not know about the drink that is still savoured in Singapore.

1. Milo was developed in Australia during The Great Depression of the 1930s
Milo was developed in Australia for Nestle in the 1930s during The Great Depression, the longest-lasting economic downturn in the history of the Western industrialised world. At the time, children were not receiving enough nutrients from their daily diet, and Milo was meant to provide them the nutrients they needed.

2. Milo was launched in Sydney, Australia in 1934
Thomas Mayne, a Nestle engineer, created the nutritious and delicious beverage using Australian milk knowledge and Swiss cocoa expertise. He named the drink Milo after the Greek mythical character Milo of Croton, who was known for his strength. Milo was launched in 1934 at the Sydney Royal Easter show in Australia.

3. Milo was sold in Singapore since 1936
Nestle Singapore said that Milo is made in a factory in Jurong here. Milo made here is differentiated by a label with the statement 'Made In Singapore'." According to Milo Singapore's Facebook page, the malt is derived from malted barley from Europe, Canada and Australia, while the milk used comes from Australia and New Zealand. It has been produced locally since 1984. Milo has been sold in Singapore since 1936.

4. Milo is savoured in several forms in Singapore: 'Dinosaur' and 'Godzilla'
A Milo dinosaur (left), which consists of a Milo drink topped with Milo powder, and a Milo Godzilla, which has an additional scoop of ice cream (or whipped cream). -- ST FILE PHOTOS

Other than the Milo drink, Milo is also eaten as a snack bar, as a cereal, and as "nuggets". Singapore bakeries also use Milo in their cupcakes and cakes. Milo also comes in the form of "Milo Dinosaur" which features a heap of Milo powder on top of a Milo drink, and "Milo Godzilla" which on top of Milo powder, has either whipped cream or ice cream.

5. "It's marvellous what Milo can do for you"
 




This jingle released as part of a Milo advertisement in the 1990s is probably the catchiest slogan Milo has had. The slogan was used for several years.

6. Milo vans still give out free cups
Seng Kang Primary schoolchildren lining up to get free cups of Milo from the Milo truck parked in the school, on Feb 19, 2010. -- ST FILE PHOTO

According to the SEA games website, more than 1 million cups of Milo are given free to Singaporeans annually through various sports and community events. Milo vans, which can generally be spotted during Sports Days in schools, provide free Milo. They can still be arranged through this website: http://www.nestle.com.sg/sponsorships. According to the Nestle website, the van holds enough Milo for at least 1,000 people.

7. Milo's nutrients
An advertisement for Milo in Singapore in 1949 touting its health benefits. -- SOURCE: THELONGWINDINGROAD.WORDPRESS.COM

The four main ingredients in Milo are malted barley, milk powder, sugar and cocoa. It also contains nutrients such as iron, vitamin C and vitamin B1.

8. Milo's love affair with Singapore's sports scene
Encik Othman Wok receiving a football from Mr Dennis Khoo of Milo to promote football in Singapore at the launch of Nestle's Football Training Scheme at the National Stadium, on June 28, 1974. -- ST FILE PHOTO

Milo started the Milo Football Training Scheme in Singapore in 1974. Soccer player Fandi Ahmad was the first player from the scheme to make it to Singapore's national football team. The scheme was stopped during former national soccer coach Barry Whitbread's tenure as technical director from 1995 to 1998. Milo is also an official partner in the South-east Asia Games being held in Singapore in June 2015.

In 2010, Milo injected more than $3 million into youth sports development. The year also marked Milo's 60th year in advocating the development of youth sports in Singapore.

9. Milo around the world
Milo is not just loved in Australia, where it was first produced. It is sold in 40 countries worldwide. Other than Singapore and Malaysia, this includes Kenya, Colombia and Peru. Malaysia has the largest Milo factory in the world located in Chembong, Negeri Sembilan, according to the Milo Malaysia website. According to the website, Milo was introduced as a tonic food drink in Malaysia in 1950. Malaysia is also believed to be the largest consumer of Milo.

10. Ways to improve Milo are researched in Singapore
Nan Hua Primary School pupils looking as a production line staff shows them a freshly packed sachet of chocolate malt beverage Milo inside the Nestle factory in Jurong on March 27, 2014. -- PHOTO: BERITA HARIAN

In 2013, Nestle announced the extension of its research and development centre in Singapore to greater focus on the food company's fastest-growing markets in Asia-Pacific.

The Nestle Singapore centre employs about 100 experts from 17 countries specialising in fields including mechanical engineering, analytical chemistry, microbiology and sensory science, taking the global lead for the company's innovations in Milo-powdered beverages.

Sources: News.com.au, Facebook, Milo Malaysia website, EDB website, Nestle Singapore website